Tips To Help Protect Your Eyes This 4th July

4th of July Diagram

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, an average of 250 people go to the emergency room every day with fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday.

Here are three tips for protecting your eyes during the Independence Day holiday and help your eyesight in the long run:

Sun Protection. Everyone knows to wear sunglasses in the summer, but make sure you buy the right pair. Polarized sunglasses close to your face or wraparound frames provide the best protection for your eyes.

Chemicals. Pools are the perfect solution to blistering heat, but if the water stings your eyes, then it’s time to get out. The chemicals in the pool are unbalanced and while it won’t harm your vision, it can leave your eyes feeling irritated. Also, if you get suntan lotion in your eyes, make sure to wash out your eyes with water immediately.

Fireworks. The Fourth of July is known for fantastic fireworks, but it is important to exercise caution. USA.gov reports that more than half the injuries on the Fourth of July were burns, which can lead to permanent vision damage. If you are going to be handling or near fireworks, always use proper eye protection.

In case of an emergency, go straight to the emergency room. The sooner the eye gets treatment, the better the chances are for recovery.

We wish all of our patients a safe and happy Fourth of July!

You Might Also Enjoy...

Winter Dry Eye Tips

Dry eyes is one of the most common complaints eye doctors get from patients during the winter season, especially in the cooler climates. That’s why we like to share some tips on how to relieve dry eye discomfort.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Did you know diabetes can affect your eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Damaged blood vessels can harm the retina, causing a disease called diabetic retinopathy.

Is your child nearsighted?

Nearsightedness in kids tends to get worse as they grow and can put them at much higher RISK for eye diseases in adulthood.